Consumer and Family Sciences

Planning for College and Career Success

 

Planning for College and Career Success addresses essential knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to live successfully in today’s world.  A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of life and careers.  The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities.  Topics to be addressed include higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, principles, and goals; life and career exploration and planning; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; decision making and organizational skills; and managing personal resources.  The opportunity for ninth graders to develop Four-Year Course Plans can be included, based on local curriculum needs.  Four-Year Plans should be developed with counselor participation.  Personal and career portfolios should be developed or upgraded with the cooperation of others, especially the business and/or language arts teachers.  This is a foundational course designed to teach knowledge and life skills that are essential for ALL high school students regardless of their career cluster or pathway.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9 and up
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: One-semester /one credit per semester

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas 

  • One of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Wellness credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)

NUTRITION AND WELLNESS

                                                (NTRN WLNS)

CIP Code: 19.0501

 

Nutrition and Wellnessenables students to realize the components and lifelong benefits of sound nutrition and wellness practices and empowers them to apply these principles in their everyday lives. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of individual and family issues. Topics include impact of daily nutrition and wellness practices on long-term health and wellness; physical, social, and psychological aspects of healthy nutrition and wellness choices; planning for Wellness and fitness; selection and preparation of nutritious meals and snacks based on USDA Dietary Guidelines including the Food Guide Pyramid; safety, sanitation, storage, and recycling processes and issues associated with nutrition and wellness; impacts of science and technology on nutrition and wellness issues; and nutrition and wellness career paths. Laboratory experiences which emphasize both nutrition and wellness practices are required components of this course.  This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway, in order to build basic nutrition and wellness knowledge and skills, and is especially appropriate for students with interest in human services, wellness/fitness, health, or food and nutrition-related career pathways.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester. 

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas 

  • A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
  • One of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)

 

 

 

AdVANCED NUTRITION AND FOODS

                                              (ADV NTRN FD)

CIP Code: 19.0504

 

Advanced Nutrition and Foodsis a sequential course that builds on concepts fromNutrition and WellnessorCulinary Arts Foundations. This course addresses more complex concepts in nutrition and foods, with emphasis on contemporary issues, or on advanced special topics such as International, Regional, and/or Cultural Foods; Food Science, Nutrition, or Dietetics; or with emphasis on a particular aspect of the food industry, such as Baking, Catering, or Entrepreneurial Endeavors. Higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes will be integrated in classroom and laboratory activities. Topics include: In-depth study of daily nutrition and wellness throughout the life span; Acquiring, organizing, and evaluating information about foods and nutrition; Selecting and preparing nutritious meals; Safety and sanitation in food production; Meal planning and preparation for specific economic, psychological, and nutritional needs; Community and world food concerns, including scarcity and hunger; Advanced impacts of science and technology on nutrition, food, and related tools and equipment; Exploring careers in nutrition and food industries. Laboratory experiences with advanced applications are required. School-based entrepreneurial enterprises, field-based observations/experiences or internships, and service learning activities are recommended.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade10 and up
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness or permission of instructor
  • Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester - course may be repeated for up to four semesters to accommodate a variety of special topics in advanced nutrition and foods
  • A Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma elective and directed elective course
  • A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
  • Content standards and competencies are defined

 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND PARENTING

                                                   (CHLD DEV)

CIP Code: 19.0706

 

Child Development and Parentingaddresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and promoting optimal growth and development of infants and children. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of child development and parenting. The focus is on research-based nurturing and parenting practices and skills, including brain development research, that support positive development of children. Topics include consideration of the roles, responsibilities and challenges of parenthood; human sexuality; adolescent pregnancy; prenatal development; preparation for birth; the birth process; meeting the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural growth and developmental needs of infants and children; impacts of heredity, environment, and family and societal crisis on development of the child; meeting children's needs for food, clothing, shelter, and care giving; caring for children with special needs; parental resources, services, and agencies; and career awareness. Applications through authentic settings such as volunteer experiences, internships, and service learning are encouraged. This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway to build basic parenting skills and is especially appropriate for students with interest in human services and education-related careers.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 10and up
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester (Schools offering this course for two semesters may title the course(s) "Child Development and Parenting 1" and "Child Development and Parenting 2", or they may use "Child Development" for one semester and "Parenting" for the other semester)

    

  • A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
  • One of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)

 

 

FASHION AND TEXTILES FOUNDATIONS

                                             (FSHNTX FND)

CIP Code: 19.0901

 

Fashion and Textiles Foundationsaddresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in fashion and textiles arenas. Topics include exploration of textiles and fashion industries; elements of science and design in textiles and apparel; textiles principles and applications; social, psychological, cultural and environmental aspects of clothing and textiles selection; clothing and textile products for people with special needs; critical thinking applied to consumer options for fashion, textiles, and related equipment and tools; care and maintenance of textile products, equipment, and tools; impacts of technology; construction and alteration skills; contemporary issues, including global applications. Work-based, entrepreneurial, experimental, laboratory, and/or service learning experiences are to be included; and portfolio activities are required.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester (May be taken for more than one year, with progressive advancement of content standards and technical skills each semester)

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas 

  • A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
  • Academic content standards: 
    http://doe.in.gov/octe/facs/textiles.html#standards
  • Curriculum Framework:  http://doe.in.gov/octe/facs/textiles.html
  • Funding: One of the list of family and consumer sciences courses from which schools must select four to teach a minimum of once every other year in order to qualify for state vocational funding- see State Rule 511 IAC 6.1-5.1-10.1 (c). This course generates state vocational funding (APC) for schools with approved FACS programs.

 

 

HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN FOUNDATIONS

                                                (HID FND)

CIP Code: 19.0601

 

Housing and Interior Design Foundationsaddresses selecting and planning living environments to meet the needs and wants of individuals and families throughout the family life cycle. Economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, maintenance, and aesthetic factors are considered. The project-based approach in this course utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes to integrate housing and interior design content.  Topics to be studied include: housing styles, locations, zones, restrictions, and ownership options; managing resources (including financing options and tax considerations) to provide shelter; contemporary housing issues, including homelessness; environmental and energy issues; impacts of technology; housing to meet special needs; elements and principles of design related to interiors, housing, and architecture; creating functional, safe, and aesthetic spaces; historical aspects and contemporary trends in housing, interiors, furniture, and appliances; exploration of housing-related careers. Applications through authentic settings such as work-based observations, internships, and service learning experiences (e.g., Habitat for Humanity) are appropriate. Direct, concrete applications of mathematics proficiencies in projects are encouraged. This course is recommended for any student for enrichment and as a foundation for students with interests in any career or profession related to housing, interiors, and furnishings.  It is recommended as a core component of the four-year career plans for the career clusters of agriculture, food & natural resources; art, A/V technology & communications; science, engineering & information technology; manufacturing & processing; business, management & finance; building & construction; education & training; health services; personal & commercial services; social & recreational services; law, public safety & security; and marketing, sales & promotion.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: One credit per semester, one or two semesters

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas 

  • A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course
  • IndianaAcademicStandards for English/Language Arts and Mathematics andNational Standards for Family and Consumer Scienceshave been integrated into this course.

 

 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY WELLNESS

                                           (HUMAN DEV)

CIP Code: 19.0799

 

Human Development and Family Wellnessaddresses development and wellness of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of human development and family wellness issues. Topics include human development and wellness theories, principles, and practices; roles, responsibilities, and functions of families and family members throughout the life cycle; individual and family wellness planning; prevention and management of illnesses and disease; impacts of diverse perspectives, needs, and characteristics on human development and family wellness; gerontology and intergenerational aspects, including adult care giving; contemporary family issues, including ethics, human worth and dignity, change, stress, and family crisis-abuse-violence; physical, mental, and emotional health issues, including substance use/abuse and eating disorders; managing the family's health-related resources; community services, agencies, and resources; and exploration of human and family services careers. Applications through authentic settings such as volunteer experiences, internships, and service learning are encouraged.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None

·        Credits: One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester

·        This may be a one-semester or two-semester course, depending on local needs and resources. Regardless of the length of the course, the emphasis is on the development and wellness of individuals and families throughout the life cycle.

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas 

·        A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit course

·        This course is one of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)
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Scott County School District 1
255 Hwy. 31 South
Austin, IN 47102

Call 812-794-8750
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